Clive Moore

Professor Clive Moore is one of the few historians equally at home in Australian and Pacific history. He is one of Australia’s foremost advocates of Pacific Studies, and is internationally regarded as a leading scholar of the Pacific, particularly of Melanesia, and of Australia. His research covers Queensland, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, and the Pacific labour diaspora.
In his academic career he specialised in the history of ethnic and minority groups in Australia, supervising postgraduate students in the history of Melanesian, Syrian/Lebanese, Spanish, Muslim and Jewish communities, and gay history. For forty years Clive Moore has been the major scholar of Australian South Sea Islanders (ASSI). In the 1970s, he inaugurated the collection of oral testimony and photographs in ASSI community and recently has been involved in establishing protocols for further research with the community. He has also completed consultancies on Australian Indigenous communities and on tertiary education in Papua New Guinea.
His more recent work (2000s to 2010s) has involved analysis of the recent ‘crisis years’ in the Solomon Islands and the involvement of the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands, and the history of Malaita Island between 1870 and 1942, the major group of indentured labourers who enlisted to Queensland and Fiji between the 1870s and the 1910s, and within the British Solomon Islands Protectorate during the twentieth century. His work connects contemporary Melanesia with Melanesian descendants in Australia and he has remained involved with Australian South Sea Islanders associations, helping to press their case for contemporary disadvantage and discrimination.
Moore is author or co-author of twelve books and four special issues of academic journals, plus more than eighty refereed academic articles and chapters. His Kanaka: A History of Melanesian Mackay (1985) is regarded as a classic text on the Pacific labour trade, his Happy Isles in Crisis: The Historical Causes for the Failing State in Solomon Islands, 1998-2004 (2004) is the major study of contemporary Solomon Islands, and his New Guinea: Crossing boundaries and History (2003) is the only English language history of the whole island of New Guinea
During the 1990s he developed supporting interests in the history of New Guinea and the nation or Papua New Guinea, and secondary interests in many aspects of Australian social history, particularly Federation and aspects of the development of racial ideology and gender and sexual identity. This is most evident in 1901: Our Future’s Past (1997) and Sunshine and Rainbows: The Development of Gay and Lesbian Culture in Queensland (2001).In 2000, he co-ordinated the Queensland section of the National Archives of Australia Founding Documents Website Documenting a Democracy: Australia’s Story and also coordinated the UNESCO-funded Feasibility Study on Distance and Flexible Learning in Papua New Guinea, for the Office of Higher Education, Department of Education, Research, Science and Technology, Papua New Guinea.
His interests in masculinity and sexuality continues during 2013 to 2015 through his involvement as a Chief Investigator in an Australian Research Council Linkage grant with the National library of Australia on the oral history of gays and lesbians in Australia. He has successfully supervised nine PhD candidates and four MPhil candidates and has wide experience as an examiner in Pacific and Australian history. In 2013 he published digitally a 270,000 word, 1,000 images Historical Encyclopaedia of the Solomon Islands (http://www.solomonencyclopaedia.net/).
In the next phase of his career he will complete three book manuscripts on Solomon Islands, and hopes to write school-level historical novels, plus an historical novel on the Kanaka and plantation era at Mackay in the nineteenth century. He is also available for consultancies and tasks as a professional historian.
Consultant historian for projects of all types in Queensland and Pacific history.
BA Hons and PhD in history.
Forty years as an academic historian
The history of Australia, Queensland and the Pacific.
Community, ethnic and minority history.
Public and organisational history.

Clive Moore is an Emeritus Professor at The University of Queensland, where he worked for 28 years, retiring as McCaughey Professor of Pacific and Australian history in 2015. In 2005, he received a Cross of Solomon Islands for his historical work on Malaita Island. He was inaugural President of the Australian Association for Pacific Studies (2006–10), in 2011 became a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. He is author of eighty chapters and journal articles and many reports and books on New Guinea, Solomon Islands, the Pacific labour reserve, Australia’s Pacific Island immigrants, federation, masculinity and sexuality. He first visited Malaita in 1976 and has an abiding interest in the people of the province and their descendants in Australia.

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8 Speilberg Street, McDowall, Qld 4053

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Clive Moore